An analysis of the topic of the racist culture of the south and the cross by langston hughes

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University Langston Hughes was first recognized as an important literary figure during the s, a period known as the "Harlem Renaissance" because of the number of emerging black writers. It is, however, as an individual poet, not as a member of a new and interesting literary group, or as a spokesman for a race that Langston Hughes must stand or fall. In his autobiographical The Big Sea, Hughes commented: The Negro critics and many of the intellectuals were very sensitive about their race in books.

An analysis of the topic of the racist culture of the south and the cross by langston hughes

Pssst… we can write an original essay just for you. Any type of essay. Get your price writers online Langston Hughes is a classic American author whose writing style is, perhaps, one of the most malleable styles in the history of American literature. In the first place, he is among the exclusive echelon of writers to oscillate back and forth in his works between poetry and prose, being so well accomplished in both forms.

Two stories from The Ways of White Folks more than adequately exemplify just how much his writing style can morph from work to work, and they also highlight how Hughes uses these stylistic changes.

He finds himself unable to handle the realization that he has a colored son, so rather than have sex with Betsy as he initially planned, he leaves hurriedly.

As the protagonist of the story, Clarence shapes the primary point of view in the text, narrating with his thoughts and even presumably talking aloud to himself, vocalizing some of these thoughts.

This causes his narrative voice to bleed into his dialogue. The more anxious he gets, the more these thoughts begin to run together. The narrative structure resorts to a series of run-on sentences, for example, when he discovers the child and recognizes it as unmistakably his.

The narration also gets more poetic as certain allusions Clarence makes in his mind become like refrains because they show up more than once e. Clarence also dominates the text with his own perspective by narrating so thoroughly. He establishes the value system for human worth.

This makes it equally ironic that his namesake never speaks and is described as deaf. Hughes seems to suggest that all the senses Clarence abuses are absent in his son.

The system they established essentially referred to a person as Black for having any noticeable trace of Black in them even if they were more White than Black, as if to suggest the White ethnicity had been tainted and could no longer be called White. This is the racist logic behind terms like mulatto, quadroon, and octoroon.

The young boy narrates the story, telling his experience to some other boy. Lloyd paid him twenty dollars a week and would often slip him fives for miscellaneous tasks or when he was leaving for several days, and more significantly, Mr.

Lloyd had no qualms with Blacks, which made him treat the narrator well. The ultimate commentary on Whites stems from how much of a rarity Mr. He is a peculiar White man in that his wife is paralyzed, so he cannot have sex with her.

He is also a depressed man who treats his depression with drinking and womanizing. Even more than the depression, though, it is pregnant with meaning that Mr.

Lloyd loses his sanity after the heartbreak he experiences with what the narrator calls a jane from Harlem named Pauline, which suggests that he had been on the edge of sanity all along.

The story establishes these two places as antitheses of one another, and this opposition of settings facilitates the story entirely.

Langston Hughes

The majority of the story occurs in Riverside Drive where Mr. Lloyd lives since the narrator is almost always there maintaining Mr. Lloyd is gone, so Riverside Drive is given presence for most of the text while Harlem is given absence with the exception of one scene in which Mr.

Lloyd finds Pauline with her colored lover.Jun 18,  · Mother To Son By Langston Hughes Well, son, I'll tell you: Life for me ain't been no crystal stair.

An analysis of the topic of the racist culture of the south and the cross by langston hughes

It's had tacks in it, And splinters, And boards torn up, And places with no carpet on the floor. Langston Hughes and The Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance was a huge cultural movement for the culture of African Americans.

Embracing the various aspects of art, many sought to envision what linked black peoples’ relationship to their heritage and to each other. Langston Hughes was one of the many founders of such a cultural movement.

Finally, Hughes uses repetition of the first and last stanza to conclude his poem. To thoroughly understand the point that Hughes is making, one must take an enhanced inspection at certain elements that Hughes uses throughout the poem.

In “Negro”, Hughes gives the reader a compact visual exposé of the historical life of blacks. Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, the second child of school teacher Carrie (Caroline) Mercer Langston and James Nathaniel Hughes (–). Langston Hughes grew up in a series of Midwestern small towns.

Hughes' father left his family soon after the boy was born and later divorced Carrie. Langston Hughes is a classic American author whose writing style is, perhaps, one of the most malleable styles in the history of American literature. Sep 11,  · In Langston Hughes' poem "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," Hughes makes use of some interesting poetic techniques.

This poem is written in free verse, and seems, at first glance, to be very unstructured. Hughes repeats words and lines, but does not make use of repeated sounds.

Langston Hughes - Wikipedia